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PHASE are currently in a Global Giving Gateway Challenge Competition to raise funds to save the lives of more women like Kanchimaya, please show you support here – http://www.globalgiving.co.uk/pr/10100/proj10001a.html

Kanchimaya Lama lives with her husband, mother in law, father in law and husband’s young sister in Macchekhola (“the fish river”) village which is about 2 days’ walk from the nearest road in Gorkha district.  Recently, a very rough track has been developed a little closer to the river, so jeeps can now get to within a day’s walk.

Kanchimaya had been married for just over a year and was looking forward, with mild trepidation, to the birth of her first baby. Unfortunately the day she went into labour, the government midwifery worker, Sunita Sharma, was away visiting her own family.  The only people there to help were Kanchimaya’s mother in law and the male government health worker.  The family were reluctant to involve a man, so they hoped everything would go naturally. After around 12 hours of labour pains, Kanchimaya felt as if she wanted to push, but was completely exhausted by the pain.  Nothing happened in the following next two hours and  the family decided to call the male government health worker, by this time it was late in the evening.

Coincidently, PHASE midwives with a visiting GP from the UK happened to be passing through the village, the health worker asked called on them to assist.  Working together the health staff were able to determine that the baby was alive and well and that there was no real obstruction, but Kanchimaya’s contractions were just not strong enough to push the baby down.  She had no strength left to help herself with this.  She needed a drip of Oxytocin, a drug to bring on stronger contractions, but for this to be done safely she needed to be in a hospital.

It took several hours to organise her transfer, first they needed to ensure that the hospital was aware she was on the way, then she needed to be physically carried a significant distance to where the jeep could collect her.  A jeep needed to be alerted to come and meet her and THEN there was a very bumpy ride of several hours to reach the hospital.

During Kanchimaya’s traumatic journey, the PHASE and government health staff worked together to make her more comfortable; providing fluids through a drip and reassuring her that the baby was OK.

The Oxytocin drip wasn’t needed after all.  The bumpy jeep ride toward the hospital did the trick and on the way there a healthy baby was born to a very relieved mum – after more than 24 hours in labour!

PHASE are currently in a Global Giving Gateway Challenge Competition to raise funds to save the lives of more women like Kanchimaya, please show you support here – http://www.globalgiving.co.uk/pr/10100/proj10001a.html